Posts

New Review: A Journalism Handbook for Media Entrepreneurs

By Jemma O’Donovan

‘A Journalism Handbook For Media Entrepreneurs’ is a handbook that looks extensively into how someone can start a media outlet by themselves, and how they would be able to keep their finances under control and to make the most of every situation. This book is full of advice and tips on how to start a successful career in journalism, and it covers every aspect you could ever need.

Upon first reading this handbook, the first thing that I found helpful was the checklist. All of the questions perfectly summarised each chapter and topic of the book, and as an aspiring writer, I found that the checklist managed to help me take away the most important points of each chapter, and that if I were to actively follow this handbook and take the steps to becoming a journalist, I think that the checklist would allow me to make sure that I had taken in the information and that I was ready to put it into practice.

I found that this handbook was very easy to follow and it never told the readers to do something without explaining how to do it, and I think this was what I valued most, because I have read handbooks in the past that express commands but do not give any tips. But this book does exactly what it promises to, and with the help of leading journalists from all over the world, I think that anyone who reads this handbook will be well-equipped to take huge steps into the world of journalism.

Bridging the Gaps in the Publishing Industry

byFrances Golinski Drinkwater

The publishing industry is broad and ever-changing, attracting book-lovers and academics alike – anyone with a creative mind and an interest in communicating important ideas. The industry has faced huge pressures in recent decades, with rapid changes due to increasing use of technology: fewer people are now reading fiction – book sales in this sector fallen by 23% since 2012, and more people are accessing content online (digital sales increased by 6% in 2016 and now account for 35% of total revenues). Nevertheless, publishing, whether in books or magazines, is still a great place to work, offering wide range of roles in a changing industry.

However, publishing faces two major problems: it is highly competitive and there is a distinct lack of diversity – both in the writers being published and the professionals working within the industry. Perhaps surprisingly, publishing has a higher applicant-position ratio than both finance and law, so competition for jobs is tough. Without training, industry knowledge and work experience, even competent university graduates struggle to find paid work in the industry. Applicants may find themselves stuck in that common cycle of lack of experience leading to no job offers leading to lack of experience. Even those who do manage to land an internship, will likely find that it’s unpaid, favouring more privileged individuals who can afford to work for free. The statistics speak for themselves: in 2017, bookcareers.com surveyed more than 1,000 people and found that more than 90% currently working in the industry classify themselves as white British.

Its not just the people who work in the industry who are overwhelmingly white – its also the writers they publish? In 2016 World Book Night, organised by the UK charity The Reading Agency, was criticised for its all-white author’s list of 15 giveaway books (their 2018 list is just slightly better, with 5 out of 23 writers of colour). World Book Day also issued its own all-white list of authors in Autumn 2016, along with the Carnegie Medal for Children’s Literature, who similarly failed to nominate any writers of colour to a longlist of 20.

Arkbound, the ‘publisher that has social enterprise at its heart’ confronts both of these problems. Founded in 2015, the Bristol-based publisher is dedicated to supporting aspiring writers and publishing professionals from disadvantaged backgrounds. Arkbound publishes authors who experience barriers to the industry – especially writers with an important message about society or the environment. It also helps individuals to launch careers in publishing.

Along with a small group of publishers across the UK, Arkbound has developed the Publishing Excellence Programme, which offers candidates valuable information about the publishing industry and teaches practical skills like proofreading, copy-editing, getting ISBN codes and contacting and networking with retailers. Candidates receive one to one tuition in the basics of both book and magazine publishing, they are assessed at the end of the course, and leave with a full reference, in-depth report and certificate. Arkbound also ensures that candidates are fully supported after finishing the course; those who complete the Programme will also be the first to be considered for any publishing positions and internships. Gradutates of the course may also be referred on to other, non participating publishers. In some cases, candidates may be directly recruited by a delivery partner after the course. In line with their commitment to improving access to and diversity in the industry, Arkbound can sponsor applicants from disadvantaged groups to cover the full cost of the course and their expenses.

The initiative is unique in combatting some of the barriers to entry in the publishing industry and providing practical and tangible results.

Arkbound also has an exciting new release from a ground breaking writer of children’s literature. Odiri Ighamre’s debut book Arcadia is a beautifully illustrated children’s story which celebrates the beauty of Africa’s natural environment and asserts the importance of conserving this beauty. Through the character of Timone, the story introduces children to contemporary environmental issues whilst celebrating diversity and imagining a truly magical fictional place.

Whilst it’s impossible to authentically tell stories which reflect the experience of every community in every part of the world, nevertheless barriers in the publishing industry are starting to be broken down. Hopefully publishers like Arkbound can play their part: by making a wider diversity of great and exciting literature more accessible to their readers, and also by opening up the publishing industry which supports it, to a more diverse workforce.

More information about the Publishing Excellence Programme
Buy Arcadia

Three Bristolian Authors You Should Know About

Words by Polly Hember

Arkbound started out in Bristol, with the aim to build futures and bridge divides in the publishing world. Publishing a community content magazine Vocalise, and with many of Arkbound’s titles written by Bristolians, Bristol will always be close to Arkbound’s heart.

Bristol is a beautiful, diverse and inspiring city. Fostering artists like Damien Hurst and Banksy, Bristol is known for it’s art scene. Celebrating Bristol’s creativity, we’ve got a list of Bristol-grown authors.

JK Rowling

JK Rowling | Medium.com

Born in Yate, just outside of Bristol. She lived just south of a small town called Dursley (sound familiar?). Her Harry Potter books have charmed an entire generation, and continue to spellbound new readers. Inspired by some of her neighbours, she told Newsround that the name Potter came ‘from people who lived down the road from me in Winterbourne […] I liked the surname so I took it, I didn’t take anything else from that family’. She wrote the infamous pages in Edinburgh, and is hailed as one the most successful authors of all time, and surely Bristol’s most famous daughter.

Amanda Prowse

Amanda Prowse | The Daily Mail

At forty, Amanda Prowse became a full time writer and penned Poppy Day, the story of an army wife whose incredible love for her husband gives her courage to rescue him from hostages in Afghanistan. Then came the Number #1 Bestseller What Have I Done? Now she has ten novels and four novellas published. Focusing on contemporary love stories with relatable female protagonists, this Bristol based author is currently working on her new series No Greater Courage.

Nathan Filer

Nathan Filer | Nathan Filer.com

Nathan Filer originally trained and worked as a mental health nurse, then later as a mental health researcher at the University of Bristol. Starting out as a writer, he performed as a stand-up poet and featured at many of the UK’s poetry nights and festivals. His poems have also been broadcast on BBC’s radio 4’s Bespoken Word and Wondermentalist Cabaret. In 2005 his poetry short film Oedipus won the BBC Best New Filmmaker Award and Berlin’s Zebra Poetry Film Award. His debut novel The Shock of the Fall describes the life of a young man with schizophrenia. Published in 2013, it received widespread critical acclaim, winning The Costa Book of the Year, The Betty Trask Prize, The National Book Award for Popular Fiction and The Writer’s Guild Award for Best First Novel. It is a Sunday Times Bestseller and has been translated into thirty different languages.