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The Publishing Excellence Programme

by Enya Holland

The Publishing Excellence Programme, developed by a handful of publishers to offer comprehensive work experience for those seeking a career in publishing or media, is currently considering new applicants. The Programme offers the opportunity to gain valuable practical skills as well as an insight into working within the industry from successful publishers across the country. Publishers currently offering the Programme include Arkbound (Bristol), Valiant (Birmingham), UpScribe (Newcastle), The Write Factor (North Devon) and Mother’s Milk Books (Nottingham).

The Programme involves one-to-one mentorship and is structured in modules covering the essential skills needed to pursue a career in the sector. Candidates can choose from an eight-week programme that focuses on several aspects of book publishing or a twelve-week programme that covers books and magazines and the basics of journalism.  Both programmes have been designed to allow the candidate to develop a first-hand understanding of the publishing process from start to finish. Modules focus on core skills such as proofreading and editing while building knowledge of processes from formatting manuscripts to managing author-publisher relationships.

Assessment of the programme is carried out throughout the placement, with either three or six core assessments depending on the length of the programme selected. Assessment tasks include manuscript proofreading, book reviews and short-story writing. Candidates will be provided with an embossed certificate on completion of the Programme, providing a useful CV-boost, as well as a detailed reference.

In addition to the knowledge and experience gained through the Programme, candidates will be supported in their next steps. This includes first selection for internships and roles within the host publisher or referral to partner companies. During the Programme, candidates will also have the opportunity to establish useful connections within the industry, with the option to work in different locations and take part in seminars and creative workshops. Some successful candidates have even gone on to start their own publishing outlets. The Arkbound Publishing Network is open to those who complete the Programme, offering guidance to those who wish to pursue this route.

The Programme is offered to those eligible to work in the UK with excellent written English skills and proficiency in Microsoft Word. Entry to the Programme is subject to the successful completion of two assessments. It may be possible for candidates to be sponsored for the Programme by Arkbound or another funding body, depending on eligibility.

Bridging the Gaps in the Publishing Industry

byFrances Golinski Drinkwater

The publishing industry is broad and ever-changing, attracting book-lovers and academics alike – anyone with a creative mind and an interest in communicating important ideas. The industry has faced huge pressures in recent decades, with rapid changes due to increasing use of technology: fewer people are now reading fiction – book sales in this sector fallen by 23% since 2012, and more people are accessing content online (digital sales increased by 6% in 2016 and now account for 35% of total revenues). Nevertheless, publishing, whether in books or magazines, is still a great place to work, offering wide range of roles in a changing industry.

However, publishing faces two major problems: it is highly competitive and there is a distinct lack of diversity – both in the writers being published and the professionals working within the industry. Perhaps surprisingly, publishing has a higher applicant-position ratio than both finance and law, so competition for jobs is tough. Without training, industry knowledge and work experience, even competent university graduates struggle to find paid work in the industry. Applicants may find themselves stuck in that common cycle of lack of experience leading to no job offers leading to lack of experience. Even those who do manage to land an internship, will likely find that it’s unpaid, favouring more privileged individuals who can afford to work for free. The statistics speak for themselves: in 2017, bookcareers.com surveyed more than 1,000 people and found that more than 90% currently working in the industry classify themselves as white British.

Its not just the people who work in the industry who are overwhelmingly white – its also the writers they publish? In 2016 World Book Night, organised by the UK charity The Reading Agency, was criticised for its all-white author’s list of 15 giveaway books (their 2018 list is just slightly better, with 5 out of 23 writers of colour). World Book Day also issued its own all-white list of authors in Autumn 2016, along with the Carnegie Medal for Children’s Literature, who similarly failed to nominate any writers of colour to a longlist of 20.

Arkbound, the ‘publisher that has social enterprise at its heart’ confronts both of these problems. Founded in 2015, the Bristol-based publisher is dedicated to supporting aspiring writers and publishing professionals from disadvantaged backgrounds. Arkbound publishes authors who experience barriers to the industry – especially writers with an important message about society or the environment. It also helps individuals to launch careers in publishing.

Along with a small group of publishers across the UK, Arkbound has developed the Publishing Excellence Programme, which offers candidates valuable information about the publishing industry and teaches practical skills like proofreading, copy-editing, getting ISBN codes and contacting and networking with retailers. Candidates receive one to one tuition in the basics of both book and magazine publishing, they are assessed at the end of the course, and leave with a full reference, in-depth report and certificate. Arkbound also ensures that candidates are fully supported after finishing the course; those who complete the Programme will also be the first to be considered for any publishing positions and internships. Gradutates of the course may also be referred on to other, non participating publishers. In some cases, candidates may be directly recruited by a delivery partner after the course. In line with their commitment to improving access to and diversity in the industry, Arkbound can sponsor applicants from disadvantaged groups to cover the full cost of the course and their expenses.

The initiative is unique in combatting some of the barriers to entry in the publishing industry and providing practical and tangible results.

Arkbound also has an exciting new release from a ground breaking writer of children’s literature. Odiri Ighamre’s debut book Arcadia is a beautifully illustrated children’s story which celebrates the beauty of Africa’s natural environment and asserts the importance of conserving this beauty. Through the character of Timone, the story introduces children to contemporary environmental issues whilst celebrating diversity and imagining a truly magical fictional place.

Whilst it’s impossible to authentically tell stories which reflect the experience of every community in every part of the world, nevertheless barriers in the publishing industry are starting to be broken down. Hopefully publishers like Arkbound can play their part: by making a wider diversity of great and exciting literature more accessible to their readers, and also by opening up the publishing industry which supports it, to a more diverse workforce.

More information about the Publishing Excellence Programme
Buy Arcadia

Diversity and the Publishing Industry

Tom Weldon, chief executive of Penguin Random House UK, noted that the book industry will ‘become irrelevant’ if it continues to fail to reflect and represent the diverse range of voices within our society.

There are many reasons for this, including a lack of contacts within the publishing industry, low levels of confidence, poor experience of mainstream schooling and sometimes greater needs around developing young people’s writing. There are many under-represented communities within the book world, including individuals from poorer backgrounds, from LGBTQ or BAME communities, or writers with a disability.

‘The past 10 years of turbulent change affecting the UK book industry has had a negative impact on attempts to become more diverse’, Professor Claire Squire states in The Writing Future, and if the publishing industry continues down this path, it ‘risks becoming a 20th century throwback out of touch with a 21st century world’.

Attempts have been made to tackle the publishing diversity deficit; Random House launched its new #WriteNow Initiative aiming to discover and mentor authors from the UK’s most under-represented communities in 2016. Authors Sunny Singh and Nikesh Shukla created the annual Jhalak Prize for Book of the Year by a Writer of Colour, an award that intends to ‘celebrate the achievements of British writers of colour’. Pioneering efforts by English PEN, the founding centre of a worldwide writers’ association with 145 centres in over 100 countries, who campaign to ‘defend writers and readers in the UK and around the world whose human right to freedom of expression is at risk’, matching writers with marginalised groups such as people in prisons, in refugee or detention centres and young people in disadvantaged areas. The Arts Council England dedicates funding to support writers from disadvantaged backgrounds. However, disproportionate obstacles to getting published for disadvantaged authors continue.

Whilst the rise of digital publishing and self-publishing services means that more writers can get their work published, there are still challenges in effectively stocking and selling books, which directly impacts what gets read. Promotion and distribution are challenges that self-published authors and even those with an independent publisher face.

The result is a gap or omission in whose accounts, voices and experiences are heard, causing common stereotypes to go unchallenged, or even reinforced by other, more privileged accounts who may misappropriate or misrepresent different narratives.

Literature plays a huge role in exploring the current socio-political climate and debate, reflecting on various aspects of society and highlighting the need for action or change. From the work of Charles Dickens to Zadie Smith, a book can really change the world. However, when some authors are excluded from being published and platformed, it is not only unfair to them as individuals but denies society the opportunity from accessing their unique perspectives.

At Arkbound, we recognise the diversity deficit in publishing and seek to address it by supporting authors from disadvantaged backgrounds. Founded in early 2015, Arkbound is an innovative and unique publisher that bridges the gap between contemporary and ‘vanity’ publishers by offering writers a chance to publish their work in a supportive and sustainable manner.

Supporting individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, Arkbound believes firmly in the power of writing as a healing and inspirational tool. Invested in developing creative talent, promoting social inclusion and breaking down barriers within the publishing industry, Arkbound is a publisher with social enterprise at heart. Many of our titles focus on under-represented voices and have supported authors working with charities like First Stop Darlington on Roofless and Emmaus for No Homeless Problem (to be published in April) to curate collections of poetry that looks at narratives of homelessness and the critical issues that are at the heart of current social and political debates.

Arkbound’s social enterprise efforts are centred around training individuals who want to enter the publishing world, offering alternative routes and equipping people with the skills and knowledge to make their dreams a reality. The Publishing Excellence Programme, launched in 2017, is just one way we try to ensure that everyone gets the opportunity to work in publishing, with many candidates carrying on to secure paid work placements. Our ‘Zooker Award‘ also endeavours to acknowledge debut books by diverse authors with an environmental or social message that encourages their readers to make positive changes, whilst Arkbound’s annual writing competition can sponsor entries from disadvantaged writers.

There is still a great way to go, with many challenges making things difficult to tell a range of stories that are truly representative of our time and society. Arkbound is committed to building sustainable futures for a diverse range of authors and will continue to keep bridging divides within the publishing industry.

Three Bristolian Authors You Should Know About

Words by Polly Hember

Arkbound started out in Bristol, with the aim to build futures and bridge divides in the publishing world. Publishing a community content magazine Vocalise, and with many of Arkbound’s titles written by Bristolians, Bristol will always be close to Arkbound’s heart.

Bristol is a beautiful, diverse and inspiring city. Fostering artists like Damien Hurst and Banksy, Bristol is known for it’s art scene. Celebrating Bristol’s creativity, we’ve got a list of Bristol-grown authors.

JK Rowling

JK Rowling | Medium.com

Born in Yate, just outside of Bristol. She lived just south of a small town called Dursley (sound familiar?). Her Harry Potter books have charmed an entire generation, and continue to spellbound new readers. Inspired by some of her neighbours, she told Newsround that the name Potter came ‘from people who lived down the road from me in Winterbourne […] I liked the surname so I took it, I didn’t take anything else from that family’. She wrote the infamous pages in Edinburgh, and is hailed as one the most successful authors of all time, and surely Bristol’s most famous daughter.

Amanda Prowse

Amanda Prowse | The Daily Mail

At forty, Amanda Prowse became a full time writer and penned Poppy Day, the story of an army wife whose incredible love for her husband gives her courage to rescue him from hostages in Afghanistan. Then came the Number #1 Bestseller What Have I Done? Now she has ten novels and four novellas published. Focusing on contemporary love stories with relatable female protagonists, this Bristol based author is currently working on her new series No Greater Courage.

Nathan Filer

Nathan Filer | Nathan Filer.com

Nathan Filer originally trained and worked as a mental health nurse, then later as a mental health researcher at the University of Bristol. Starting out as a writer, he performed as a stand-up poet and featured at many of the UK’s poetry nights and festivals. His poems have also been broadcast on BBC’s radio 4’s Bespoken Word and Wondermentalist Cabaret. In 2005 his poetry short film Oedipus won the BBC Best New Filmmaker Award and Berlin’s Zebra Poetry Film Award. His debut novel The Shock of the Fall describes the life of a young man with schizophrenia. Published in 2013, it received widespread critical acclaim, winning The Costa Book of the Year, The Betty Trask Prize, The National Book Award for Popular Fiction and The Writer’s Guild Award for Best First Novel. It is a Sunday Times Bestseller and has been translated into thirty different languages.